All things Mexico

 

This was my first time blogging in an A to Z Challenge and I’m glad this experience was a joint effort with a lovely group of ladies in our South Of The Border (SOTB) Bloggers group. 

With us being a group with a broad range of locations, experiences and lives within Mexico it also lead this challenge to a variety of topics.  I hope you enjoyed reading the blogs from this challenge and look forward to the next.

Read More

 

Zoológico Parque del Niño is about family, fun and education all in one location.  The park is located in the heart of Valle de Guadalupe.  There is multiple play areas with picnic tables and BBQ’s for people to use.  You can paddle boat in the pond or swim in one of the three pools.  There is a jump area, game room and even bikes or carts to use.  The main educational portion is the small zoo at this park with the animals being well-kept along with the habitat.  They have “trains” that tour areas of the zoo and park along with interpretative signs on the different wildlife and habitat.   [...]  Read More

Read More

 

Valle de Guadalupe is being called the “Napa Valley of Mexico” and in a recent article in our local newspaper the following information was gathered from the State Secretariat of Tourism and the National Institute of Statistics and Geography.  As of 2017, there are 99 wineries, 47 restaurants, 23 hotels, 10 ranches with sale of wine, as well as six museums and other attractions in Valle De Guadalupe and his doesn’t include the wine areas to the south of Ensenada.  Sunset Magazine recently posted this video of the area.   [...]  Read More

Read More

 

Tecate is not just a little town on the border of the US and Baja California, Mexico but is also classified as a Pueblo Mágico.  This is an initiative led by Mexico’s Secretariat of Tourism, with the support from other federal agencies, to promote towns around the country that offer visitors a “magical” experience by reason of their natural beauty, cultural richness, traditions, folklore, historical relevance, cuisine, art crafts and/or great hospitality.

Read More

 

               Heading out to San Felipe

We just visited San Felipe in Baja California for the first time.  San Felipe is found on the Sea of Cortez and is approximately 120 miles south of the US border.  The drive from Ensenada took about three and one half hours.  It is beautiful as it has many rocky mountains with desolate valleys of sand.

Read More

 

 

 

 

 

Oh my goodness, my love of cheese comes from the Italian part of me and is in seventh heaven here as there is such a variety of cheeses from fresh, soft, semi-soft, semi-firm to firm.  The cheese here in Mexico doesn’t seem to have all the artificial flavors and coloring added to them like in the US.  Even though they are different from up north, there is a lot of varieties that are the equivalent to what I had in the US.  For example, I really like the flavor of the Chihuahua (Mennonite) cheese which is similar to Cheddar cheese and the Requesón is very much like Ricotta.  Of course, there’s also Manchego which is like Monterrey and Oaxaca is similar to Mozzarella or string cheese.  One of my favorite places to go to forcheese is Los Globos, they have a small shop in our town but there is a larger selection at the shop in San Antonio de las Minas.  You can taste and sample all the varieties of cheeses they have available along with olive oils, salsas, jellies, wines and other local products.   [...]  Read More

Read More

 

Olive Oils, I currently have in my shelves are from Santo Tomas and Sol Y Barro
Cieli Winery offers olive oil with balsamic vinegar with baguettes while wine tasting.

I have tried and purchased several different varieties of olive oils from the Valle de Guadalupe area just northeast of Ensenada and is also part of Mexico’s major wine country.

Read More

The Kumeyaay Indians were hunters, gatherers and fishers from the coastal, inland valley, and mountain regions along the present day Baja California border region with the United States. The territory originally extended from around Escondido in California to the Ensenada area.  Most communities are located near stands of oak trees which provide acorns, an important food staple in the Kumeyaay diet.  Only about 65 Kumeyaay speakers remain in the area, all but a handful south of the border.  [...]  Read More

Read More

Family is many things from a blood relatives to the tribe we create which can be a group of friends.  Since the other half and I are now 1,000 miles away from our core family of children and grandchildren we need to eventually form a local core which by no means replaces our main family but will enhance everything we already have.

Read More